5.1 C
Srinagar
Friday, December 9, 2022

After army claims dip in IED explosions, low intensity blast in Pulwama village

Three days after the Indian army said that the Improvised Explosive Device attacks in Jammu and Kashmir have gone down, suspected insurgents triggered a low-intensity explosion in the volatile Pulwama district of the disputed region.

Officials said the low-intensity IED was “remotely triggered” by pro-freedom insurgents in Dangerpora village of the southern district but “there was no causality or injury to anyone”.

The IED was planted near a shop that was partially damaged in the blast. A picture circulating on social media showed bricks lying on the front of the shop with its shutter damaged.

Armed forces cordoned off the village, 32 kilometers from Srinagar, the summer capital of Jammu and Kashmir, and carried out a search operation.  

The IED explosion was the second attack by suspected militants in the day. Earlier, a grenade was thrown at the police in the main town in northern Kupwara district, 85 kilometers from Srinagar. Reports said the “rusty grenade” didn’t explode and a bomb disposal squad defused it in a controlled explosion.

Pertinently, the Indian army said on Tuesday, this week, that two years after the IED attack on CRPF convoy in Pulwama killed 40 troopers, there was a dip in the number of such attacks by militants in the conflict-ravaged region. A report quoting an unnamed army official said that 13 IED blasts took place in the past three years and 21 were found and detonated.

In 2019, 10 IED blasts were set off and 12 were defused by the bomb squads from different locations in the valley, the army official was quoted in the report.  

Last year, only one blast took place while nine IEDs were recovered. This year, 2021, past two months January and February, 2 IED blasts occurred and both were recovered.  

On February 22, government forces defuse an IED in Kenihama on Pantha-Chowk which was planted in a small tin box. Government forces are reportedly alarmed by the recent arrival of new magnetic bombs that have wreaked havoc in Afghanistan.

The police have seized 15 sticky bombs in the February raid in the Jammu division and raise concerns that an unnerving tactic attributed to the Taliban fighters in nearby Afghanistan could be spreading to the India-Pakistan conflict.

Latest news

Please email your videos, stories and opinions to [email protected] and we will publish the selected ones on our news portal.

Related news